Author: Bert Wolters

Azure Site Recovery for VMware; current state

Last week I was asked to participate in a project regarding Azure Site Recovery, where we conducted a Proof-of-concept to show the capabilities of ASR to migrate/protect VMware workloads towards the Azure platform. As you might know, one of the pre-requisites of a replicated Virtual Machine in Azure is to be connected to a Virtual Network. In our case, the customer already had some workloads running on the platform, so we were provided with a Virtual Network and a VPN site-to-site connection. The workloads of that customer are running in Azure V1 Virtual Machines, so that gave us the ease of being able to patch in to that network and saved us a lot of time. Next thing is to check the Virtual Machine in vCenter to see if the Operating System is within the Azure Supported OS boundary. What a luck, its a Windows Server 2008R2 box, so we’re good to go! Next steps are to create a Site Recovery Vault and the installation files for the combined roles of the “Unified Server”. This is a combination of the configuration –  and the process server,  which actually converts the VMDK files to a format which Azure better understands. Don’t forget to download the registration key while your at it. Next step is to download and install the vSphere 6 PowerCLI tools. This still needs to be version 6,...

Read More

Why combining OMS and Recovery Services makes sense

Backup and recovery solutions inside the Operational Management Suite are powered by Azure Site Recovery and Azure Backup. Site Recovery’s replication capabilities help protect critical applications and extend datacenters to Azure, enabling disaster recovery and application migration to Azure. Azure Backup protects your application data and retains it for up to a theoretical 99 years. Currently, the only visible object of the link between OMS and Azure Backup/Azure Site Recovery, aside from the licensing model, is the presence of the Azure Backup and Azure Site Recovery “Solutions” in the solution gallery. Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery Solutions in OMS   After enabling these solutions in OMS, you will be able to view the status of each of these services on a tile.   BCDR Solution Tiles When clicking on a Solution Tile in the portal, you should be able to drill down into the service to view additional information. For Backup and Disaster Recovery this functionality is currently very limited. Essentially, it currently is a repetition of the data displayed on a tile.   Site Recovery Drilldown Backup Drilldown   Currently there are no dashboard items available in the OMS portal to use in your custom dashboards, but it seems this will only be a matter of time before they will be provided.   Conclusion: The current information displayed in the OMS portal for Azure Backup and Azure Site...

Read More

Install the OMS agent using the command line

When you’re using your deployment tool of choice, you’d might need to know how to install the agent through the command line. Once you’ve downloaded the agent to a familiar location, use the following string to deploy: MMASetup-AMD64.exe /C:”setup.exe /qn ADD_OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE=1 OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_ID=<your workspace id> OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_KEY=<your workspace key> AcceptEndUserLicenseAgreement=1″ The only things you’ll need are the WORKSPACE_ID and the WORKSPACE_KEY. You’ll find those after logging into http://www.microsoft.com/oms and selecting the right workspace in the top-right corner of the screen. In the screen that appears, select the workspace to navigate to the settings menu. In the example above you can see that my workspace is located in West Europe (WEU) and that I’m an administrator of that workspace. Next in the settings menu, you’ll end up in the Accounts section of the settings menu. You’ll see a lot of information regarding your OMS subscription here, but it’s not the right information for our scenario. We’ll need to click on “Connected Sources”  for that. When you do that, you’ll find the workspace key and the primary and secondary access key. With these keys you’ll be able to complete the command line and you will be able to install the agent through the command line interface. MMASetup-AMD64.exe /C:”setup.exe /qn ADD_OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE=1 OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_ID=<your workspace id> OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_KEY=<your workspace key> AcceptEndUserLicenseAgreement=1″ For those of you already involved in the DSC side of things, you’ll find more information here. If any questions popped...

Read More

Using the Azure Security Center – Anti malware

In a recent tweet-streak I was clearly overjoyed by the announcement of the Azure Security Center being available as a Preview Feature in Azure. If you want to see where all the fuss is about, you can enable this preview feature here. Today I decided to use some of the recommendations of the security center and actually do something with them. The Azure Security Center (can we abbreviate this to MASC?) advised me to enable Network Security Groups on all of the subnets of my Virtual Network in Azure, which I did. Another thing it recommended me to do, was to deploy anti-malware on all of my Azure VM. (Yes, I currently only have one ;-)) This was so amazingly simple I couldn’t resist to share it with you… After activating the feature inside the “New” or “Ibiza” portal, it will do some inventory on your subscription and return some advice. It will advise you to install anti-malware on your VM’s in Azure. Your actual implementation of this advice depends on business-case, use and lifecycle of the VM, etc. Since this blog covers the installation of antimalware through the Security Center, let’s put all of those difficult things aside and lets just see how to do this already… In the Azure Security Center select the VM’s section and drill down on the alert on Anti-Malware not present. This will...

Read More